PTOM Nov. 2010 Issue Contributions

Holy redesign, Batman?! If you haven’t already noticed, things are a little different with the Nov. issue of PlayStation: The Official Magazine. This issue gets a major facelift and restructuring with some cool new layout tweaks and minor changes here and there. My monthly two-page review write-up of PSN titles won’t be appearing any more in the same format, but I’m still contributing heavily to PSN-related content in the magazine. I tackle the DLC Roundup,  Minis Roundup, and a hefty portion of the Best Games section, and I’ll still be contribution other pieces from time-to-time. For starters, you can peep my review of Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World: The Game on pg. 85. Love Love Love it, despite it’s few flaws. I’m a sucker for 8-bit art and chip music, but the game has some sturdy legs to it beyond aesthetics. Also, chip-punk rockers Anamanaguchi did the entire soundtrack, and man is it sweet. You can buy it separately on iTunes, which I have done. Great listening. Anyhow, that’s all for now. More PTOM related stuff coming up!

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Feature: Checking in from PAX East: New Location, Same Love


“For anybody unable to afford the trek across country to PAX Prime every year, the announcement of a separate East Coast PAX was welcome. I can also imagine Boston business owners in the area near ground zero welcomed the news with excitement, expecting to cash in on the sudden crush of business. Some nearby establishments placed signs, like baited lures, welcoming attendees in clever ways. Others seemed genuinely puzzled over why their clientele suddenly made a rapid shift towards the geekier end of the spectrum. Whether it was ready or not, the city of Boston was host to a gamer influx of truly epic proportions.”

Check out the full rundown here at Ars Technica.

Feature: Retro Consoles Spawn Modern Music

“With every new generation of über-sexy, high-powered gaming consoles, another wave of outdated machines are inducted into the videogame hardware hall of fame – a graveyard of wires and small cartridges destined to gather dust on the top shelf of countless closets. It’s a grim fate for these once-beloved devices. But some old-school game consoles are being resurrected from the dead by the power of rock. Not content to let classic gaming gear from decades past go to waste, a tech-savvy array of underground musicians are digging out their retro consoles, dusting them off, and firing them up for a new purpose: to rock the living hell out of them.”

Check out the full article here.