Chip Bits: Starscream – The Space Years

From out of nowhere,  Starscream has come rocketing into the chiptune stratosphere with a blend of spaced-out 8-bit rock that’s hard to resist. With a drumkit, a Game Boy, and a Commodore 64, this duo crafts a melodic and often haunting landscape of blippy sounds that drills its way into your brain like a sonic sniper bullet. They moved the floor like hell at Blip Fest 2009, and cemented their already strong hold on my eardrums.

Their just-released, two-song E.P. The Space Years is a concept record of sorts that showcases the sounds of the C64 more heavily. Both of the tracks are epic-length affairs that amount to a combined 15+ minutes of experimental bliss. This ultra limited release (only 200 copies were made) is already sold out, but you can check out the second track over at their MySpace page. It’s definitely worth a listen, as is the band’s previous album released as a free download over at 8bitpeoples.

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Foecrusher – Game Boy metal

File this one under: just for fun. Blip Fest 09 (at least what I was able to experience of it) was a total blast. I haven’t written, recorded, or performed music for years, but it was fun to get out and go hands-on with one of the most fascinating music scenes around. I’ve made Game Boy music before, many years ago, but never released any of it. After re-acquiring some (reasonably well) functioning Game Boy hardware and a copy of LSDJ, I’ve set out to create some new face melting chiptunes in the genre of heavy metal. I’ll be posting my tunes for live streamage as I finish them over at 8bitcollective. The project is called Foecrusher and my first track “Sword of Awesome” is available to decimate your ear drums. Enjoy.

UPDATE: Two new tracks added! Check out “Silence 15 Foot Radius” and “Charge Into Battle.”

Feature: Two Rock Guitars and a Famicom


“For the two breathing members of the Brooklyn-based band The Depreciation Guild, a love of intense rock music and the vintage video game sounds of the 1980s have melded into something powerful. Years of button mashing and pixel blasting to the sound tracks of classic games on the Atari, NES, Sega Genesis and other gaming dinosaurs have hard-wired an instant recognition for the raw blips into the brains of millions of players over the years. Today, those sounds are being harnessed for a new purpose.”

Check out the full article here on PopMatters.