Sins of a Solar Empire: Rebellion Review (@GamesRadar)


“‘Epic’ feels too inadequate a word to describe the massive space battles that pulse like lifeblood through the heart of Sins of a Solar Empire. Panning the camera around for an intimate view of the mayhem yields breathtaking scenes of destruction as huge fleets of lumbering star cruisers clash amidst thunderous barrages of laser fire and concussive missile bursts. It’s these highly strategic, explosive encounters that make all the planning that goes into expanding your galactic empire so worthwhile. Rather than overhauling what already works, Sins of a Solar Empire: Rebellion continues to refine and expand the core formula established back in 2008, offering just enough new factions, ships, and extra content to entice us back into the fray with weapons systems at the ready.”

Check out the full review here at GamesRadar.

Review: Frozen Synapse


“For days on end, I’ve been staring at the blue hued corridors of maze-like compounds filled with ugly neon soldiers trying to kill each other. My eyes are starting to hurt, but it’s hard to look away. Every click of the mouse sends my brain swirling with the strategic outcomes that could unfold. Will my grenade take down that sniper or will he have disappeared long before it ignites? Will another foe turn the corner and run head-long into the blast? I have no clue. Each turn you take in Frozen Synapse is a calculated gamble, which makes the constant cycle of second guesses, tactical sneakiness, and erupting chaos in this turn-based shooter intensely absorbing.”

Check out the full review here at IGN.

Hands-On Preview: Disciples III: Renaissance


“Coming out nearly a decade after 2002’s Disciples II, which was old-school even then, Disciples III: Renaissance is obviously a niche offering. The grim, war-torn landscape of Nevandaar, filled with warring gods, demonic hordes, and rampant death, makes a great stomping ground for your battle ready armies – but grid-based fantasy strategy games simply aren’t in vogue these days. But our inner geeks would sign up to pass kidney stones the size of 20-sided dice to get to this game when it ships next week…”

Check out the full hands-on preview here at GamesRadar.

Flash Game Freebie: Pixel Legions


“On their own, individual pixels seem small and insignificant, but when you put hordes of them together, their value becomes readily apparent. No, we’re not talking about retro videogame art – this is war. It’s a war fought by throngs of tiny, pissed-off glowing pixels. It’s a war that will draw you into its fold and completely annihilate any chances of escape. Thought you were going to get some work done today? Think again. Pixel Legions is calling.”

Check out the full article here at GamesRadar.

Review: King Arthur: The Role-Playing Wargame


“Neocore Games didn’t beat around the bush in coming up with an accurately descriptive title for King Arthur: The Role-Playing Wargame. The game beautifully blends some familiar and engaging war strategy genres into a powerful concoction that’s heavily steeped in Arthurian legend. The King Arthur mythos is ripe with fantastic subject matter and story elements to pluck from, and it’s seamlessly woven throughout the adventure in interesting ways. This epic and challenging quest to unite Britain by sword doesn’t disappoint, but you’re going to need some great fortitude to persevere in your righteous conquest.”

Check out the full review here at Cheat Code Central.

Review: Osmos

“Playing Osmos is like gazing into a petri dish full of living microorganisms through the lens of a high-powered microscope. You control one single mote amongst many in a low-key cage-match to see who can grow the biggest. As a single-celled organism, your main objective in most levels is to absorb enough matter to dwarf — and ultimately consume — the bulk of the other motes in your microcosm. Any smaller motes you come in contact with are absorbed and make you increase in size. But accidentally bump up against motes that are larger than you, and they’ll suck you up like the last drop of a frosty milkshake.”

Check out the full review here at IGN’s Green Pixels.

Review: East India Company

“There’s something almost freeing about being able to focus your empire building efforts solely on maintaining ports for trade and expanding your seaworthy fleet. So many strategy games – even those with seafaring elements – keep players shackled to managing troops and resources on land that it’s a welcome change to be concerned solely with the naval elements. Balancing your attention between being a shrewd businessperson with an eye for economic gain and becoming a formidable adversary when negotiations between competing factions inevitably break down is quite engaging, assuming you don’t fall prey to some of the game’s tough love.”

Check out the full review here at Cheat Code Central.